The History Hotline

by Deanna Lyncook

The History Hotline is the hottest line for all things Black history and beyond... A space to have honest conversations about Black history and how it impacts the world we live in. We’re here to explore some of the facets of Black history ignored by the mainstream, your teachers and the textbooks.

Podcast episodes

  • Season 1

  • 133: How did bun and cheese become a Good Friday staple?

    133: How did bun and cheese become a Good Friday staple?

    Have you ever wondered how bun and cheese became Jamaica's Good Friday treat? Tune in to this week's episode to find out more about this history, how it came to be and what it signifies.

  • 132: Vybz Kartel and the Privy Council

    132: Vybz Kartel and the Privy Council

    On Thursday 14th March, in a landmark decision the UK’s privy council overturned the murder conviction of the Jamaican dancehall artist Vybz Kartel, impacting also the ruling on his three co-defendants: Shawn Campbell, Kahira Jones and Andre St John.  It was overturned due to findings that the original conviction was compromised due to juror misconduct, during the 2014 trial. Vybz Kartel at this point has been in prison since 2011 was convicted of the murder of Clive “Lizard” Williams in one of Jamaica’s longest trials. Find out more about the Privy Council rulings and why Jamaica's highest arm of justice is the UK's Privy Council and not the Caribbean Court of Justice. Find us here

  • 131: Bob Marley One Love, An Additional History

    131: Bob Marley One Love, An Additional History

    An episode based on my undergraduate dissertation that was all about political and religious influences of reggae music in the 1970s, which coincidentally talks us through some of things I wish the Bob Marley: One Love film did not give enough time to. This episodes explores the political context in 1970s Jamaica as well as the Rastafarian movement and the influences of these on reggae music as the mouthpiece for the oppressed.

  • 130: Benjamin Zephaniah: Activism and Integrity

    130: Benjamin Zephaniah: Activism and Integrity

    “Try to pigeon hole Benjamin Zephaniah at your peril. Poet, writer, lyricist, musician, actor, republican, activist, campaigner, freedom fighter. It’s impossible. His achievements are too plentiful to mention.” – Opening for an interview with Shelley Carter for Birmingham Living magazine. Benjamin Zephaniah was born on 15th April 1958 in Handsworth, Birmingham. This episode looks at his life, his activism and all he stood for. It explores his refusal to accept an MBE and the implications that had. Clips taken from: ITN Archives Articles featured: Tribune Article "Us An Dem: The Radical Benjamin Zephaniah" 'Me? I thought, OBE me? Up yours, I thought' Updates on the MRes legal challenge Follow us on socials

  • 129: The Race Relations Act, 1965

    129: The Race Relations Act, 1965

    The Race Relations Act was passed in 1965. It set about to formerly criminalise racial discrimination but only certain kinds. This episode we'll be thinking about how successful this was in improving the situation for Black people in Britain, or was it performative and largely unhelpful? For more information on my PhD study email me at: d.r.a.lyncook@qmul.ac.uk or message me on social media. Keep up to date with us.