Parsha Pick-Me-Up

by Yitzchak Sprung

Take a few minutes to study the parsha with Rabbi Sprung on Thursdays from Bereshit to V'Zot Habracha. Find the Parsha Pick-Me-Up on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher or wherever you get your podcasts.

Podcast episodes

  • Season 2

  • Beha'alotcha: Finding a Second Act

    Beha'alotcha: Finding a Second Act

    If that were the end of the passage, we would understand that Levites retire entirely at the age of 50. However, the next verse continues: (26) However, they shall minister with their brothers in the Tent of Meeting, to perform the duty, but they shall do no service. You shall do thus to the Levites concerning their duties." This is a little confusing. Are they to minister in the Tabernacle after the age of fifty, or not?

  • Bemidbar: The Levites Overtake the Firstborns but Failure Does Not

    Bemidbar: The Levites Overtake the Firstborns but Failure Does Not

    Notice, the verse tells Moses to Take the Levites because the firstborn are holy. That doesn’t make sense. Shouldn’t it say take the Levites because the Levites are holy or it should saythe firstborn are holy, so take them? Surely, it does not make sense to take the tribe of Levi for God because the firstborns were saved in Egypt! Sources: Num. 3: 12, Bemidbar Rabbah 3:5

  • Bechukotai: "If"

    Bechukotai: "If"

    What does the im, supposedly "if" really mean? The Sages tell us it means something much more meaningful than just "if." This word opens our Torah portion and contains within it so much more. Take three minutes to the Parsha Pick-Me-Up to learn more. Source: Avoda 5a.

  • Behar: A Time and Place for God

    Behar: A Time and Place for God

    God chose the 7th day of the week and the 7th year of the Shmitah cycle to be special for Him but the special nature of these Sabbaths is dependent upon us. Take three minutes to listen to the Parsha Pick-Me-Up to learn more.

  • Emor: Cursed is that One, Fortunate the Other

    Emor: Cursed is that One, Fortunate the Other

    Our Torah portion begins with our deepest hope and greatest fear: getting credit for our children or receiving opprobrium.